The Inscripta Blog

March 23, 2021
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Inscripta Expands Operations with New Office and Association Membership in Europe

Exciting news: Inscripta is heading to Europe! We are expanding operations beyond our U.S. base with a new office in Copenhagen, Denmark, to help meet the needs of a thriving gene-editing research community in Europe.

In addition to opening our new office, we’ve also joined EuropaBio. Also known as the European Association for Bioindustries, the organization promotes an innovative and dynamic European biotechnology industry. EuropaBio and its members (including us!) are committed to the socially responsible use of biotechnology.

The Inscripta team has been talking to potential users of our automated genome engineering system from the start to ensure that our Onyx™ platform would address key applications and achieve important community goals. All along, we’ve been impressed by the enthusiasm and scientific innovation among researchers in Europe. Joining EuropaBio and opening our Denmark office will allow us to work more closely with this dedicated community as we roll out the Onyx platform to more labs.

The office in Denmark will serve as the hub for our operation in EMEA and is located in the Copenhagen Bio Science Park (COBIS). It’s part of the area known as Copenhagen Science City and is one of Europe’s strongest innovation districts. According to Kim Soerensen, Inscripta’s Head of Commercial Operations for EMEA, “This is an environment of excellence when it comes to knowledge and commercial use of biotechnology, medicine, and pharmacology.”

In a public statement about this news, our CEO Sri Kosaraju said, “Inscripta’s goal is to empower scientists around the world with technologies that enable them to probe the genome with unprecedented breadth and speed. We believe that the Onyx platform will help usher in a new era of biological discovery and yield solutions that benefit all, such as sustainably derived materials, improved crops and better foods, and new and improved ways to treat disease.”